A new Tardis of a Timelord

A post shared by AJ Barse (@ajbarse) on Dec 14, 2017 at 5:29pm PST After reading countless posts, technical documents, and pulling apart the top plate of my Swiss made Sellita SW200 about a dozen times: I finally got the stem and the keyless to work again! Apparently, this is not uncommon on the Sellita…

3D Printing in Watchmaking

In the world of watchmaking and 3D printing, there isn’t much overlap yet. But, and forgive the pun here, times are changing. From the story of how two college students starting Vortic watches to solve the problem of bringing back American watchmaking through the 3D printing and manufacturing all new cases in Titanium for watch…

Salish Sea-worthy SKX007

I love a good tool watch. Something that literally can be worn for anything, go anywhere, and be anything. For this project, I wanted to take what I learned from building the Bellingham Bay, but go a little more simple and practical. Enter the Seiko skx007 and its workhorse 7S26 movement. The watch is an icon for…

A Technologist’s Tale as a Timelord

After over four months of design, researching, importing parts, and collaborating with a local leather works show; this prototype “Bellingham Bay” PNW built, Swiss movement watch is finished! I am a watch nerd. A horologist. A tinkerer. And yet, a technologist. When I set out on this project, I wanted to take a geek’s approach to building…

A Timelord Strapped for Time

I love a good NATO strap, most adventure inspired watch enthusiasts are, but I’ve never really had any luck finding a comfortable leather one. For some reason with my wrist either the strap sits the watch case too much off my wrist, or the band itself doesn’t sit the watch case square on my wrist….

Journey as a Timelord; Part 4

Finally! Three click springs later, I was able to reassemble the SW200 movement and wind (and set) the crown stem! Next order of business; using the M3 X .35 Tap to bore out the crown tube hole and set threads to take a Rolex style (7mm) screw down crown tube. Making sure the tap was…

Working prototype of the “Bellingham Bay”

After setting the hands on the dial (and figuring out the trick to setting the second hand), and pushing in the winding stem, it came to life! The Bellingham Bay is based off the classical Tudor Heritage Black Bay watch in case, bezel, and snowflake hands. The dial I had originally designed to have laser etched,…

Journey of a Micro-Maker

  What would it take to make a “Northwest Built” Swiss watch? I don’t know, but working on finding out. Taking the traditional “geek in the garage” approach of building something, I wonder if I could build something so small and percise using “off the shelf” parts. After quite a bit of research and finding…